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Celebrating 20 years, EGEC shares declaration on the great role of geothermal energy

EGEC Geothermal Declaration June 2018
Alexander Richter 10 Jun 2018

Celebrating its 20th Anniversary, the European Geothermal Energy Council (EGEC) has published a declaration highlighting the contribution of geothermal to the energy transition and the decarbonisation of the European economy.

In a declaration as part of its 20th Anniversary, the European Geothermal Energy Council (EGEC) is highlighting geothermal as a relevant energy source for the future of Europe and the contribution of geothermal to the energy transition and the decarbonisation of the European economy.

For the energy transition to be successful, we need integration and a coherent mix in all energy sectors which cannot be accomplished without the versatile contribution of geothermal energy, EGEC states in a new declaration released in celebration of its 20 years anniversary.

Ahead of the meeting where the European Energy Ministers will meet to decide on the level of ambition for Europe’s 2030 renewable energy target, EGEC highlights the contribution of geothermal to the decarbonisation of the European economy and its even bigger untapped potential. The presentation of the declaration was accompanied by a tasting of “geothermal food and drinks” – cheese, tomatoes, wine, beers, and other delicacies, all produced with the contribution of geothermal energy – that showcased how geothermal is more than just energy. It also means food, tourism, jobs, and development for local communities.

The new EGEC declaration looks at the current challenges of the energy transition and at the necessity to meet our energy needs with optima scenario in terms of both costs and affordability, for customers and citizens. A single technology, a single renewable energy can never meet this demand alone. However, when combined renewable energy sources can meet our future energy needs. This is where the role of geothermal comes into play. As a truly local source of energy, which can produce power and heat for cities, industries, and rural communities, geothermal fosters local economic development through many indirect positive effects, such as jobs creation and air quality.

“Europe has been a global leader in the geothermal sector for decades,” said Marco Baresi, ?Institutional Affairs and Marketing Director at Turboden S.p.a. and EGEC Board Member, introducing the event. “When we look at the future energy targets for Europe and those laid out in the Paris agreement, we see that many challenges still lie ahead. Both EGEC and the European geothermal industry are committed to maintaining this leadership, delivering affordable energy and constant innovation.”

On the milestone of 20 years of the association, Burkhard Sanner, founding member and former President of EGEC, said: “I had the pleasure to chair the founding session of EGEC, with 21 representatives from all over Europe, from Iceland, to the Azores, to Turkey. When we released the Ferrara Declaration, someone said that the numbers and the ambition for 2020 were impossible to reach. But now we are close, and we must be proud of our achievements.”

Read the full declaration here (pdf)

Source: EGEC