News

DOE Webinar on $10 million EGS funding opportunity, March 6, 2014

EGS diagram (source: DOE, Geothermal Technologies Program)
Alexander Richter 5 Mar 2014

The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office will host a webinar on March 6, 2014 on a $10 million funding opportunity announcement for research and development that will advance Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) in the United States.

The Energy Department’s Geothermal Technologies Office will host a webinar on a $10 million funding opportunity announcement for research and development that will advance Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) in the United States.

Energy Department Announces Webinar for $10 Million Geothermal R&D Funding Opportunity
WHEN: Thursday, March 6, 2014, 1-3 pm EST
HOW: Register here for the Webinar

EGS R&D Funding Opportunity. This funding opportunity will support up to ten, three-year, collaborative research and development projects focused on applying innovative technologies to obtain and process high-precision data to better characterize and target potential EGS sites. EGS research advances the Department’s goal of proving next-generation clean energy technologies by driving down the costs of commercial-scale EGS projects to achieve cost-competitive, renewable electricity for American homes and businesses. In pursuit of this goal, the Department supports transformative research focused on removing obstacles to commercial EGS development to help industry better access, create, and sustain engineered reservoirs. Read the full FOA on Exchange or register today for an informative webinar.

To generate renewable power around the clock, EGS projects produce energy from intensely hot rocks buried thousands of feet below the surface. Since EGS systems initially lack the permeability or fluid saturation found in naturally occurring hydrothermal systems, the working geothermal system must be “created” through rock stimulation. Based on U.S. Geological Survey studies, this vast, untapped thermal resource could be greater than 100 gigawatts, enough to continuously power millions of American homes.

Learn more about the Department’s efforts to develop geothermal energy.