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New geothermal heating project starts operation in Paris, France

Arcueil, greater Paris region, France (source: flickr/ Stephane Payrard, creative commons)
Alexander Richter 24 Nov 2015

A new geothermal district heating has been inaugurated in two communities in the greater Paris region in France, supplying heat to around 7,500 homes.

A new geothermal heating project was inaugurated past week in Arceuil and Gentilly in the greater Paris region in France.

With early planning having started about ten years ago, ArGéo, the geothermal heating network of Arcueil and Gentilly, is the first project of this kind created from scratch in 30 years in the Ile-de- France. Operation of the project started in mid-October this year. , has been operational since mid-October.

The project is now heating around 7,500 housing units, including municipal buildings and buildings of social homes in the two towns.

The plant is fuelled by hot water derived from wells at a depth of 1,600 meters and a network of 15 km piping and about 120 delivery points. In a statement, Christian Metairie (EELV), First Deputy Mayor of Arcueil said “It is a great satisfaction to see the project seeing the light of day and this is a strong sign a few days before the big climate meetings in Paris.”

“Geothermal heating reduces carbon emissions by around 60% and in addition guarantees the price for heating for the long term because it does not depend on gas prices.”  The new system fuels around 60% of the energy demand, avoiding emissions of 14,600 tons of CO2 per year, equivalent to the annual emissions of 8,000 vehicles.

The water derived from the wells has a temperature of 62 degrees Celsius. The liquid then passes through the exchangers, which take heat, before being discharged once cooled by a second well. “We have more extra boiler,s one in the central and distributed in six other cities, which can heat when it is very cold and for maintenance of the well,” says Lorraine Devouton, head of development Operating in Engie-Cofely Networks (formerly GDF Suez), the operator.

The total project cost was more than EUR 32 million ($36 million), of which 23% was supported by the Environmental and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) and the regional government.

Source: Le Parisien