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TV coverage on CarbFix project in Iceland – turning CO2 into minerals

Well heads at Hellisheidi power plant of Reykjavik Energy (source: flickr/thinkgeonergy, creative commons)
Alexander Richter 26 May 2017

A recent TV piece by AlJazeera covers the Icelandic CarbFix project. An exciting project that recently been capturing carbon-dioxide emissions mix it with water and inject it into the ground in an approach to cut emissions.

In a recently published TV piece, AlJazeera covers the CarbFix project in Iceland.

The goal of the project is to cut emissions by utilising a unique carbon capture system called CarbFix at the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant near the capital city of Reykjavik. The project is capturing carbon-dioxide emissions mix it with water and inject it into the ground.

With this process, CO2 is transformed into a mineral called calcite within only six months. The then solid form of CO2 storage is seen as one of the most effective ways of preventing the gas from entering the atmosphere.

“We want to do our part in trying to solve this problem of the increased concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere,” says Ingvi Gunnarsson, a geochemist at CarbFix. “What comes from the power plant once we’ve produced electricity is hot water and gas. We need to dispose of that somehow. If we would not be capturing it, it would be released into the atmosphere.”

Source: AlJazeera