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Geothermal Development Associates commissions Kenya wellhead plant

Eburru Wellhead Geothermal Power Plant by KenGen, Kenya (source: Geothermal Development Associates)
Alexander Richter 24 Feb 2012

Geothermal Development Associates report that the 2.5 MW Eburru Wellhead Geothermal Power plant has been commissioned and is operated by KenGen. GDA designed the plant and steamfield, and supplied all of the major equipment to the location 2 hours outside Nairobi.

Announced earlier this month, Reno, Nevada based Geothermal Development Associates (GDA) announces that the Eburru Wellhead Geothermal Power Plant has been commissioned and is now generating up to 2.52 MW for the Kenya Electricity Generating Co. (KenGen). This is a major milestone for KenGen, as it is their first geothermal wellhead power plant in commercial operation. The project is also unique because, for the first time, KenGen engineers carried out implementation work without the assistance of external consultants. Civicon served as the General Contractor, responsible for construction of the plant.

During the month of January, GDA engineers worked closely with KenGen engineers and operators and Civicon construction crews to complete the commissioning and performance testing. The plant was first synchronized to the grid on January 23rd. The performance testing was completed just six days later on January 29th.

GDA designed the plant and the steamfield, and supplied all of the major equipment. This included an Elliott GYR steam turbine, Kato generator, Lufkin gearbox, Graham condenser and vacuum pump, Goulds cooling water pumps, and a Cooling Tower Depot single-cell fiberglass tower. GDA also manufactured auxiliary equipment in-house to minimize installation time, including the lube oil system, turbine control valve assembly, compressed air system, fire pump skid, emergency power system, and plant control system. The equipment and materials were shipped from the US to Kenya in 11 shipping containers one month ahead of schedule.

KenGen is the leading electric power generation company in Kenya, producing about 80% of the electricity consumed in the country. They currently own and operate multiple geothermal power stations at Olkaria with a total capacity of 150 MW.

Eburru is located approximately 2 hours outside of the capital, Nairobi, in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley. The Eburru geothermal field is on the flanks of the Ol Doinyo Eburru Volcano and is situated 11 km northwest of Lake Naivasha.”

Source: GDA release