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Aberdeen based start-up plans transfer oil & gas know-how to geothermal

Aberdeen harbour, Scotland (source: flickr/ Rab Lawrence, creative commons)
Alexander Richter 5 Aug 2020

A new start-up in Aberdeen, Scotland is taking on the task of selling geothermal to the oil & gas sector hoping to transfer skills and push geothermal in the United Kingdom.

A newly founded company in Aberdeen in Scotland, UK has set itself up to create a a future in geothermal energy for “oil and gas assets and people”, so a recent update via Energy Voice.

With the experience of the oil & gas sector in Aberdeen and the “brutal” rounds of oil industry job cuts, Tech-Terra, plans to be “rapidly assessing Oil & Gas Operators assets and developments in the UK and Internationally for conversion to Geothermal service, demonstrate that geothermal is the most natural-fit energy transition opportunity for the oil & gas sector, and increase value from existing hydrocarbon producing assets by imagining new green energy futures for them.”

Tech-Terra Managing Director and Founder Brian Archer things that the company can have a meaningful impact to help Aberdeen become part of the geothermal story and get the companies in the oil and gas sector interested.

So while oil and gas might not be gone, a lot of the sector’s expertise could benefit from a transfer into an industry requiring a similar skill set.

The company has been able to join the Climate KIC Accelerator programme of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology, run by the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation.

The company is working on establishing a few studies and projects and raise money to “take on some assets and convert them.”

Initial discussions with oil sector firms are encouraging, as they face a drive towards renewable energy and geothermal being an interesting bet.

Archer  though acknowledges that the geothermal sector is “small beer” when stacked up against the oil and gas and, indeed, other green technologies.

So while there have been challenges to geothermal development in the UK, as laid out in the article, the time for geothermal might have come.

Source: Energy Voice